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BBC World News

News/Business. International issues. (CC) (Stereo)

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00:30:00

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Australia 5, China 5, Rupert Murdoch 5, United States 5, Washington 5, Sydney 4, Europe 4, Syria 4, U.s. 4, Clinton 4, Assad 4, Belfast 3, Brussels 3, New York 3, Italy 3, Murdoch 3, Singapore 3, Vermont 2, Melbourne 2, Honolulu 2,
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  PBS    BBC World News    News/Business.  
   International issues. (CC) (Stereo)  

    July 12, 2011
    12:30 - 1:00am PDT  

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>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you?
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>> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome. >> the headlines. strong words from washington. hillary clinton says syrian president bashar al-assad has lost legitimacy. new allegations of malpractice by a journalist working for rupert murdoch. >> from greece to italy. eurozone finance minister say that they are determined to stop the crisis from spreading. they say they did not buy their way to success. it is 11:00 a.m. here in singapore. >> 4:00 a.m. here in london. broadcasting around the world.
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>> that the clinton has said presidents assad of syria has lost legitimacy. she says he has failed to deliver reforms and stop a campaign of violence against his people. she did not call on him to step down but made it clear he had no support in washington. from washington, this report. >> this made washington very angry, an attack on the embassy in damascus. for washington, the fighting and syria has gained a slightly more personal dimension. a few hours after the attack, this was hillary clinton's
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message to mr. . >> united states strongly condemns the failure to protect facilities in domestic, including french embassies and our ambassadors residents. if anyone thinks that the united states is secretly hoping their regime will emerge from this turmoil to continue its brutality and repression, they are wrong. president assad is not indispensable. and we have absolutely nothing invested in him remaining in power. >> it is unclear how much difference this could make. the united states has very little political leverage over presidents assad. protestors and syria made a big difference last week when he went to the city of hama during mass demonstrations there. he used human shields according
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to some, and triggered the embassy attack. >> secretary clinton's message was the strongest by far but that the united states has sent, but it still fell short of calling him to step down. it is a constellate very difficult to get out of. president assad must know that the president -- that the united states will be wary of him in syria. >> the scale of the uk phone hacking scandal is enhanced by new evidence that shows that security for queen elizabeth and other members of the royal family has been put risk. if the bbc has learned that according to company e-mails, the news of the work was paying of royal protection officer for information. there was a director of royal contacts, including royal
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household staff. four other developments, they tried to obtain details of the former prime minister gordon brown's finances, and that the newspaper tried to access medical information about one of his children culminated an act rupert murdoch's bid for b sky b being referred to ofcom. >> the security of the royal family is the duty of the royal protection branch. the integrity of those officers must be beyond doubt. this morning i learned that news of the world e-mails uncovered by news international in 2007 contains evidence that the sunday newspaper was paying reuter protection officers for private information about the royal family. it later emerged in the guardian that the funds of prince charles and the duchess of cornwall may have been hacked.
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in one of the dynamite e-mails, the disgraced royal editor was requesting cash to buy a confidential directory called the green book of the royal family's land mine telephone numbers and all the phone numbers including mobile's of the household staff. a police officer in the royal protection branch had stolen of directory and wanted 1,000 pounds ford, it is alleged. >> not only the royal family, but people who work with them and their friends, it is appalling breach of security. this latest disclosures about systematic wrongdoing at news of the world could not come at a worse time for the papers under, because news corp. is trying dubbed by one of the important business media businesses in the u.k., british sky broadcasting. his news corp. owns just 39% of
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it. the reason he wants 100% is because bskyb is a growing business, generating huge amounts of cash. this year profits are close to 1 billion pounds. news of the world off is under pressure. mr. murdoch has been arguing that his takeover should be allowed to go through without a lengthy investigation. jeremy hunt had a deal. now mr. murdoch withdrew that, asking for the deal to go to the ofcom. the delay in the takeover is better for him than the alternative of abandoning it all together. as a result, of the corporation an announcement this afternoon, i am wonder referred this to the competition commission.
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and we will be writing to them this afternoon. >> the leader of the opposition did not want to hear from mr. hunt. >> the prime minister was wrong not to come to the house of commons today. as on every occasion during this crisis, he has failed to show the necessary leadership the country expects. >> here is what the prime minister said to mr. miliband. >> if i was running that company now with all of its problems and the difficulties and the mess that they are in, there's a focus on cleaning that up rather than the next course of moves. >> the deputy prime minister met the family of the murdered school girl buried it was a disclosure that the phone was hacked that did so much damage to the reputation of mr. murdoch's company. >> was thinking about picking up the voicemails.
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>> it reminded that all week has been an eternity in business and why a long delay in the bskyb bid is the best that he can hope for. >> in egypt, a terminal which supplies gas to israel and jordan has been blown up in the fourth attack on the pipeline this year. it caused a huge fire which could be seen up to 20 kilometers away. security officials say that the attack was carried out by masked gunmen. barack obama has asked republican officials to compromise in order to keep the united states from tipping into another recession. they're trying to reach a deal on bringing down a level of u.s. debt. the republicans are pushing for spending cuts. the treasury says that it will run out of money if congress does not increase its borrowing
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authorities. a huge explosion at a munitions dump killed 12 people. it caused widespread across the island. the debt crisis still dominating finance toss. this time dominating them in brussels. >> the eurozone finance ministers say they are determined to stop the greek debt crisis from spreading to larger economy such as spain and italy. after meeting in brussels, the eurozone chairman says that they had agreed for a number of measures, including giving countries more time to pay back bailout loans and lowering interest rates. >> this is europe's new nightmare, spelled out on the
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italian front pages. the day of fear, reads one. the day when the amount of interest begins to rise. breeze, this light man says. -- like greece, this man says. another adds, it is dangerous and serious. italy is the eurozone's third biggest economy. its debt is larger than the total value of goods and services it produces each year. until recently, the rate it borrowed money at was fairly stable. but on monday, it hit a costly high of over 5.7%. agreed debt crisis is driving risks. investors feared greece will be unable to pay off all of its debts one day. that made them aware that just because the country uses the bureau, it does not mean their money is safe. so they are reevaluating their
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risk of lending to other indebted euro nations. making it worse in brussels, there are serious political distances within the eurozone about how to reduce greek debt. they did agree last night to enlarge the eurozone's main bailout fund, reduced interest rates charged to countries that borrow from it, and with private sector involvement length and the payback time on monday. >> we stand ready to adopt further measures that will improve the resistance to contagion. including enhancing the flexibility of the europe financial stability. listening to maturity, so that loans and lower interest rates. >> still, investors aren't kirk -- concerned that the long-term solution may not come soon.
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rome is beginning to smolder and all of europe is a risk. >> in other news, an earthquake has struck off the coast of the philippines. the epicenter was southwest of the island. there was no tsunami alert issued. no reports of damage or casualties. a suicide bomber has killed at least five people and wounded 19 others as he was being searched at a political rally in northwestern pakistan. 6000 people were attending a rally organized by a senior member of the pakistan muslim league. he hopes a way can be found to quickly deliver aid to drought- stricken somalia. he was speaking at the end of the u.s. refugee camp in e.d. appeared he said that the death
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rates seen during the crisis have been staggering and american help was being set back. the somalia border in southeastern ethiopia. >> an uncertain start to new life as refugees. hundreds of somalis moving into this refugee camp, one of the three existing camps for somalis here. and problematic ever since it opened. hot, dust-filled wind blows through the camp for much of the time. for now, all too few of the refugees have the protection to these protections of a tent. a stubbornly high death rate here. the delegation representing the u.s. and other supporters came to see what needs to be done to prevent this refugee emergency turning into a disaster.
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>> the main thing is to focus on the humanitarian side in very deep need of better tend facilities, better health facilities as well. yes, but this is a top priority and you are right, the death rate that we're seeing here is staggering. >> if the influx of somali refugees continues as it is our becomes bigger, the plan is to turn this area here in to the next refugee camp. it could be needed in just a matter of weeks. everyone agrees that the emergency operation needs to be ramped up considerably. and the latest batch of refugees across the border, the greater number of the elderly and the infirm can be adding to the complexity of this crisis. >> you are watching news day on the bbc very light from singapore and london. still to come, 30 years on, one
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father hopes to lift the one child policy in china. police officers in northern ireland trying to restore order after riots broke out in belfast. thousands of people in bosnia have attended the ceremony that marks the 16th anniversary of the massacre of around eight tain -- 8000. more than 600 victims were recovered from mass graves. >> 16 years on, the pain is just as rock. -- raw. a mother and anguish at finding the remains of her son, to pelvic bones and a pregnant of his jaw was all that could be repaired -- recovered. today, another green coffin lowered into the ground.
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over 600 were buried on this anniversary, identified through dna analysis. for those grieving, some fathers, husbands, it was the worst massacre in europe since the second world war. thousands of bosnian muslims had crowded into the un safe haven as the war raged on. but the armed dutch troops were easily overrun. the men and boys were let off to be slaughtered. about 8000 of them within the space of five days. it is the only part of the balkan war to be labeled genocide. the bosnian serb commander was found reassuring moslem children that all would be fine. it was his troops to carry out the killing. he was indicted for genocide in 1995, but evaded justice until this year. in may he was arrested in serbia and the oil-rich trial at the u.n. tribunal in the hague. 16 years on, bakir remains
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deeply divided between its main ethnic groups. the names of victims were read out. but families gathered, yearned for closure. this is a nation still struggling to recover from a conflict that tore apart. -- tore it apart. >> i am in singapore. >> the headlines just now. hillary clinton has said the syrian president has lost legitimacy in the eyes of the u.s. and is not indispensable. >> pressure on rupert mob out as it in testifies following allegations of malpractice by journalist on his newspaper. >> let's stay with that stored for the impact of the news corp. reaches far beyond the uk. his company was started in
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australia in 1962 as news limited. he controls about 70% of australian daily newspapers. this professor is ahead of journalism at the university of technology in sydney and joins me on the line now. thank you for joining us. i want to begin by calls and your country to launch an inquiry to murdoch in australia. t think there may be evidence there that there could be malpractices taking place, too? >> it is possible but it is different here today. it is not as harry tested as the tabloids. the politicians are still really scared of rupert murdoch. the greens have nothing to lose because the australians announced in the editorial that they would destroy the greens in the political course.
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>> the greens are calling for this parliamentary inquiry there is a political element because they have the majority in the upper house. >> they do, but they have to get the labor party to support them. many labor governments have done to every deals with rupert murdoch here in australia to advance their short-term political interests and his long-term corporate interest. the sun would back them at this stage. >> we had been speaking to a number of people on this story which has engulfed the media here. a couple believe this to be a watershed moment for rupert murdoch. do you agree with that? >> it could well be. here in australia, it has been 50 years of uncontested advance and rise. but in australia, murdoch is much more dominant than in britain. hear, until about this
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absolutely pete, there was very little reporting about what was going on except for their competition. but they control most of the major newspapers outside of sydney and melbourne. his only real competition is in sydney and melbourne. it is a blanket coverage if they have. >> thank you for joining us, alan night from the university of technology in sydney. petrol bombs and bricks were thrown in belfast. officers used water cannons to control the crowd of up to 200 protesters on the night before the biggest day of the loyalists march. the latest from belfast. >> frankly, trouble had been expected but expected to come from the loyalist and the unionists and the protestant side of the community.
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it came and fat from the nationalist community, from a part of what that fast where they hijacked a bus, drove it don't -- drove it toward a police cordon designed to cape loyalists and republicans apart. they need to celebrate the highlight of the marching season bird on the 12th of july, and republicans have a standard because the parade passed by their areas. a loyalist insist they had the right to march with a call the queen's highway in ireland. the republicans hijacked a bus and throw off a number of passengers. now there has been sustained rioting throughout the night. >> we have the details from cathar. >> allegations that they bought their way to hosting the world cup in 2020 have been vigorously
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denied. let's begin for the first time since the victory, that claims of corruption were based on prejudice bird he also dismissed a plan of review and explain why to our sports editor. >> qatar cause the biggest upset in football history when its futuristic vision for staging the world cup was given backing last december. but calls for review of that decision have been growing amid corruption allegations. tonight, the head of the bid finally gave his response. >> an absolute outrage. if there is evidence to investigate the evidence. i agree with that completely and we've already said that . if please go ahead. but if there is no evidence, nothing there, and it is based on rumors. >> the most damaging claim was the former official 30s is that three members were paid $1.5 million to vote for kadar.
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-- qatar. she is withdrawn those allegations. qatar 2022 says that they have done nothing wrong and all allegations against them are false. but what facing expulsion from fifa later this month, they know that there will be questions on how they won the world cup. qatar is worried its reputation could be damaged if he is found guilty. it plans to spend billions of pounds on new infrastructure and air-conditioned stadiums like this one which won them the world cup vote. but voters still insist they got it wrong. >> if is unusual to say the least a hold an event of this extraordinary magnitude in a country of one city, in effect.
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you have to question whether it makes sense to build the kind of infrastructure it takes to accommodate the world cup. >> their celebration following last year's world cup decision has proved short-lived. despite the country's efforts to draw a line on the criticism of its victory, but doubts are unlikely to end here. >> the most populous province in china has as the country to relax laws that restricts most families to one child. it has been in force for more than 30 years. >> in china, they are known as little emperors. they have no brothers or sisters. it is because of the country's one child policy. they have all the attention of doting parents and grandparents. when he grows up, the tables will be turned. he will have to support his
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relatives. i think it is up big burden for one child to support six adults. many chinese families have this challenge. china's rapidly aging population is only adding to the problem. to many pensioners, too few workers. much harder to keep that booming economy growing. now the company -- now the country's wealthiest provinces calling for change. they want them was there to be allowed to have more than one child. at that minorities in china are already exempt from the one child policy. many say it is time for everything to change. so far the authorities have said no. the question is, for how much longer? >> you've been watching abc news. >> just a reminder of our main news again this hour.
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more to come. >> makes sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its
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global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. >> garrison keillor: martín espada was born in brooklyn, new york. he moved to massachusetts; worked as a tenement lawyer in boston, teaches at the university of massachusetts, amherst-- creative writing, latino poetry, and the work of pablo neruda. he's published 16 books, and his collection of poems, the republic of poetry, was a finalist for the pulitzer prize. >> at 16, i worked after high school hours at a printing plant that manufactured legal pads-- yellow paper stacked seven feet high and leaning as i slipped cardboard between the pages, then brushed red glue up and
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down the stack. no gloves-- fingertips required for the perfection of paper, smoothing the exact rectangle. sluggish by 9:00 p.m., the hands would slide along suddenly sharp paper, and gather slits thinner than the crevices of the skin; hidden. then the glue would sting, hands oozing till both palms burned at the punch clock. ten years later, in law school, i knew that every legal pad was glued with the sting of hidden cuts; that every open law book was a pair of hands upturned and burning. ( applause )